What I’ve learned from Twitter

Nothing.

Okay, kidding. KIDDING. Pipe down. Jeez. I have, in fact learned an important lesson from Twitter in the past month…

via CarlaLynneHall on flickr

If you knew me on Twitter before I parted ways with Brains on Fire, then you knew @spikejones. I’d been tweeting under that handle for a number of years and had actually had the privilege of followers that were approaching 6,000. But for one reason or another, in this new adventure, @spikejones got lost in the shuffle and, in fact, is no more. I didn’t panic. I didn’t pitch a fit. (I DID try and get it recovered to no avail.) But in starting over at @askspike, I realized that while I’ve always been preaching about not caring about the number of followers you have, when you go from 6K to 0 overnight and then back up to about 227 in a couple of weeks, you are forced to chew on the reality of numbers.

I could bitch and moan and tell you that I miss not having “influence” and an audience of 6,000 people listen to me. But the reality of it is that it’s been a good lesson. I’ve been able to connect with people again on a more intimate level. I’ve been able to really LISTEN to the people I’m following since it’s a smaller number than before. And I’ve really been able to walk the talk and realize that it’s better to have deep relationships with a few than shallow relationships with many.

Do we all want to grow our numbers? I think so. I think it plays to the fact that we all believe that more is better…even if sometimes it isn’t. But as @askspike takes over where @spikejones left off, I’ll see how the great Twitter experiment goes. And you know how much I love Twitter…

3 Comments

  • March 7, 2010

    Joe O'Keefe

    Growth is the part of the business that is necessary but is also scary. Not scary in the “how can I handle this?”, but in the sustainability sense. I am good with names. When my customers get out of their cars, I start eyeing the wines I know they are going to like or I saunter to some of their standbys. I do not want to lose that intimacy but I am one person, with a great manager, and a growing customer base. For us to survive the store has to be busy, but I still revel in those smaller moments when a few of the “original tribe” are hanging out together before we close on a Friday. That intimacy feeds the trust that builds relationships.

  • March 16, 2010

    Will Marlow

    I’m sorry – I missed the reason why you lost your first Twitter handle…I’m assuming that Twitter gave you the boot for some reason…is that right?

  • March 16, 2010

    Spike Jones

    It’s a long story, Will. but Twitter didn’t give me the boot. I can say that much for now. The rest I can tell you over beers…

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